Heart Disease Vaccine Prioritization

Angie Szumlinski Health

The CDC’s phased approach to vaccine distribution puts all patients ages 16 to 64 with medical conditions that increase the risk for severe COVID-19 infection in the 1c category, citing heart conditions, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity among examples. However, the CDC made no attempt to stratify by levels of risk among those conditions. “A coherent vaccine allocation policy promoting the …

Mix it Up – The Vaccine Debate

Angie Szumlinski News, Studies

A U.K. trial has been launched to see if giving people different COVID vaccines for their first and second doses works as well as the current approach of using the same type of vaccine twice. The idea is to provide more flexibility with vaccine rollout and help deal with any potential disruption to supplies. Scientists say that mixing the vaccines …

Interim Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People

Angie Szumlinski Featured

This is the first set of public health recommendations for fully vaccinated people. This guidance will be updated and expanded based on the level of community spread of SARS-CoV-2, the proportion of the population that is fully vaccinated, and the rapidly evolving science on COVID-19 vaccines. For the purposes of this guidance, people are considered fully vaccinated for COVID-19 ≥2 …

Moderna and Red Rash

Angie Szumlinski Health

An angry red rash being called “COVID arm” is a harmless but annoying response in some people who get the Moderna vaccine. Aside from sometimes being itchy, it doesn’t appear to be dangerous and people who get it should not hesitate to get their second dose of the vaccine. “We want to reassure people that this is a known phenomenon, …

Vaccines – Keep ‘Em Coming!

Angie Szumlinski Health, News

Moderna has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for permission to fill its COVID-19 vaccine vials with up to five additional doses to ease a bottleneck in manufacturing. The availability of COVID-19 vaccines has been a source of frustration since their clearance in the U.S. in mid-December. While the pace of administration has picked up to more than 1 …

One or Two Doses?

Angie Szumlinski Health, Studies

Arguments have been made that because COVID-19 is such a serious disease that is rapidly spreading throughout the world and because vaccines can be made and delivered at a relatively slow rate, a first dose should be given and the second dose delayed until a large amount of the population receives the first dose. To be clear, it is known …

The Debate – One or Two Doses

Angie Szumlinski Health, Studies

Health experts have conditionally backed the U.K.’s decision to delay administering a second dose of the coronavirus vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech, warning that the need to suppress the new coronavirus strain “cannot be overstated.”  On December 30, 2020, following MHRA approval of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine, the four UK Chief Medical Officers, based on a recommendation by the …

Israel Sees 60% Drop in Hospitalizations

Angie Szumlinski News, Studies

The full effects of Pfizer’s vaccine are only slated to kick in around a month after the first shot, but data from Israel, home to the world’s fastest vaccination drive, has already shown that there is a stark drop in infections even before this point. Drawing widespread, international interest by sharing early data, Maccabi Healthcare Services reported earlier this month …

Pfizer First Dose – Allergic Reactions

Angie Szumlinski Studies

On December 11, 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine, administered as two doses separated by 21 days. Notifications and reports of suspected severe allergic reactions and anaphylaxis following vaccination were captured in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), the national passive surveillance (spontaneous …

NSAIDs or Acetaminophen

Angie Szumlinski Health, Studies

More people with fever and body aches are turning to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to ease symptoms, but the drugs have come under new scrutiny as investigators work to determine whether they are a safe way to relieve the pain of COVID-19 vaccination or symptoms of the disease. One theory is that NSAIDs alter susceptibility to infection by modifying angiotensin-converting …